Curated Insights 2018.06.29

75% of bull markets are nothing but multiple expansion

Hedge funds’ best ideas? Those are just stocks they’re dumping

“This suggests that the pitched stocks were their ‘best ideas’ but not likely any longer. Returns of pitched stocks diverged from market immediately after the pitches—long pitches spike up and short pitches spike down. These results suggest that these investment conferences are closely followed by other investors and have high market impacts. The majority of the outperformance occurs before the pitches. Outperformance after the pitches are likely driven by inflows from other investors that follow these investment conferences.”

Amazon’s scale in Japan challenges rivals and regulators

In the wake of Amazon’s rise, Rakuten, its largest Japanese rival, which operates the country’s biggest online marketplace, has expanded aggressively into financial technology, mobile phones and home-sharing. Still, to compete better against Amazon, the company is aiming to create its own logistics and delivery network within two years. Unlike its US rival, it had left warehouse and inventory management to the retailers that use its marketplace rather than building its own proprietary systems.

Amazon held a 23 per cent share in Japan’s internet retail market compared with Rakuten’s 18.5 per cent share last year, after overtaking its Japanese rival in 2016, according to Euromonitor. Other industry data shows the two rivals in a tight race.

“There is no way rivals can compete against Amazon. They invest in the best-in-class technology with little regard for profits so that they can create a sophisticated logistics operation,” said Shinichiro Nishino, a former Amazon executive who was hired by Mr Bezos to launch the business in Japan.


Amazon wants the whole package in delivery

Amazon plans to provide entrepreneurs known as “Delivery Service Partners” with guaranteed delivery volume, use of Amazon’s logistics technology, and discounts on Amazon-branded delivery van leases, vehicle insurance, Amazon uniforms, and even fuel. The company envisions hundreds of owners operating fleets of 20 to 40 vehicles and eventually having “tens of thousands of delivery drivers across the U.S.,” Amazon trumpeted in its press release.

The independent contractor owner-operator model is similar to how FedEx handles its last-mile deliveries, while UPS delivery trucks are staffed by unionized employees, Blackledge writes. Amazon has been steadily encroaching on all parts of the traditional delivery firms’ turf in recent years, with initiatives including a delivery service for small businesses, building its own air cargo hub, and even expanding into ocean freight shipping. Amazon already boasts a fleet of 7,500 trucks, 35 aircraft, and over 70 delivery centers. This pales in comparison, however, to FedEx’s stated world-wide armada of 650 planes, 150,000 delivery trucks, 400,000 employees, and 4,800 fulfillment facilities.

Danny Meyer’s recipe for success

Rather than rolling out replicas of USC in other cities, as is a common tactic for ambitious restaurant empire builders, Meyer employed a different strategy. Sticking close to home, Meyer expanded by replicating his enlightened hospitality, cultivating regulars, and stimulating buzz by endowing each new restaurant with its own memorable menu and décor.

“The fact that Danny has been so successful translating the culture across so many different restaurant brands, and engaging a lot of people to help him, is key to understanding the quality and influence of the culture he inspired. He happens to be in the restaurant business, but if he had been a university president, you would have a different kind of college. When he looks at you, he sees you. He’s not playing the role of an executive. He’s a hugger. He trusts his gut, and his gut is always working.”

Meyer never set out to be a business mogul. He simply wanted to create a homey, unpretentious, and affordable Michelin star–quality restaurant that did not exist in New York in the 1980s. Unlike the dominant, ultra-expensive, and exclusive French haute cuisine establishments, such as Le Pavillon and Lutèce, which oozed effeteness, Meyer wanted USC customers to feel comfortable asking their server, or even the sommelier, to explain and pronounce menu items. He wanted people walking in without a reservation to feel welcome ordering a full-course meal at the bar.

Stewarding the culture in association with every business decision is the main responsibility and passion for Meyer, who recently turned 60, and is not slowing down. Also on his agenda? Creating a few more fine casual brands, such as Shake Shack and Tender Greens, and making them all as essential to millennials as McDonald’s once was to boomers.

All the questions you wanted answered about Bird Scooters and their recent $300 million funding

Capital. Because Bird was first to market, extremely innovative, quick to hire talented leadership and an experienced founder it was able to raise $125 million in an extraordinarily short period of time. That has allowed the company to launch in many markets, build amazing applications, design future versions of the scooter and monetize while many companies are still just drawing up their go-to-market plans. This allowed Bird to then raise $300 million from some of the top VCs in the country. Capital of course drives scale advantages and when you have “winner take most” markets it also has a way of scaring away some investors from investing in the 3–5th “me too” competitors. You can expect some strong competition, but it’s unlikely that there will be 5 great scooter companies.

Density. One huge advantage the early-movers have is “density.” A dockless eScooter solution is only compelling if you believe that you’ll always be able to find a scooter in a relatively short walking distance or it defeats the purpose. If Bird has thousands of scooters in a neighborhood (and if it can acquire these scooters at cheaper prices due to scale advantages) then it’s significantly more difficult for new entrants to launch without serious capital and it’s hard to get serious capital from investors who perceive you’re late to the game.

Data. Bird already has an enormous lead in data collection. What appears as just an electric-powered scooter is really a computer with wheels. Between our on-board CPUs and your mobile phone companions we have an enormous amount of data on transportation routes, where riders want to pick up scooters in the morning and where they leave them in the evening. This not only allows Bird to have advantages in right-sizing city inventory levels and proper placement to maximize yield, but the company has already been providing this data to cities to help them better plan their cities of the future. We clearly need a world in which gas cars don’t dominate dense city environments and providing this data to cities is a great start in that direction.

Mechanics. What is even more remarkable than “chargers” is how Bird has build out local teams of mechanics in each market, providing large legions of skilled labor the ability to earn meaningful dollars for repairs to wheels, brakes, cables, batteries, electronics, etc. Local politicians wanting to see local job creation rather than jobs at tech firms all migrating to San Francisco should be heartened. Because each market won’t have unlimited labor suppliers of repair people and because the largest services can pay the best, there is inherent advantage in capturing the early pools of mechanics.


How WeWork’s revenue-sharing leases could affect property investors

Both WeWork and THRE are keeping details of the revenue-sharing lease under wraps but, broadly, it means that WeWork does not have to pay a fixed amount of rent. If it is doing badly and cannot attract tenants, it pays less — or nothing — to its landlords, THRE and PFAE. Conversely, if it does well, it can pay more.

This has implications for property investors. By offering an uneven and potentially volatile income stream in place of a steady and fixed one, a lease of this kind changes the bond-like nature of property as an asset class into something closer to an equity.


The business of death has a bright future in Japan

The funeral business has a bright future in Japan, where deaths have outpaced births every year since 2007. Almost 30 percent of the population is 65 or older. And this year is a tipping-point of sorts. After 2018, the number of Japanese women of child-bearing age will decline so sharply that by 2025 the population is forecast to drop by four million people, equivalent to the population of Los Angeles.

Trump tariffs would be bad for the entire global auto industry, says Moody’s

Daimler AG, BMW and Volkswagen AG all import more than half the vehicles they sell in the U.S. from other countries. The breakdown is 50% for Daimler, 70% for BMW and above 80% for VW. “However, these imports represent only about 12% of BMW’s total annual unit sales, about 8% of Daimler’s global light vehicle sales, and around 3% of VW group sales (figures include sales from Chinese joint ventures),” said Clark. “On the other hand, BMW and Daimler export more than half the vehicles they produce at their U.S. assembly plants. Fiat Chrysler Automobiles NV produces about half its vehicles in the U.S., with the remaining units imported mainly from Mexico and Canada.”

Moody’s estimates that Toyota exports roughly 22% of cars produced in Japan to the U.S., while Nissan exports about 31% of its domestic production to the U.S. market. Honda has the most diversified production of the three and a low ratio of exports to the U.S. but is planning to increase exports in 2018. Korean car makers Hyundai Motor Co. and Kia Motors Corp. import a bit more than half their vehicles sold in the U.S., mostly from Korea but also from Mexico. Both were planning to produce more SUVs and crossovers in the U.S. in the next two years.

Mexico would be hurt more than other markets as many big car makers have assembly plants there to serve the U.S. market. Mexico produced 3.8 million vehicles in 2017, 82% of which were exported. Of that total, 84% went to the U.S. and Canada. In the first quarter of 2018, the car industry accounted for 2.9% of Mexico’s GDP, meaning tariffs would hurt more than the car manufacturers and auto-parts suppliers.

One group that will be especially hard hit is U.S. car dealers, which rely heavily on imports. “These companies have minimal U.S.-produced vehicle penetration to offset reduced sales from price increases on imported vehicles,” said the report.

Where 3 million electric vehicle batteries will go when they retire

By 2030, there will be a 25-fold surge in battery demand for EVs. Automobiles have overtaken consumer electronics as the biggest users of lithium-ion batteries, according to Paris-based Avicenne Energy. By 2040, more than half of new-car sales and a third of the global fleet –- equal to 559 million vehicles — will be electric. By 2050, companies will have invested about $550 billion in home, industrial and grid-scale battery storage, according to BNEF.

Introducing a16z crypto

Trust is a new software primitive from which other components can be constructed.

The new primitive of trust also means that 3rd-party developers, entrepreneurs, and creators can build on top of crypto-powered platforms without worrying about whether the rules of the game will change later on. In an era in which the internet is increasingly controlled by a handful of large tech incumbents, it’s more important than ever to create the right economic conditions for developers, creators, and entrepreneurs. Trust also enables new kinds of governance where communities collectively make important decisions about how networks evolve, what behaviors are permitted, and how economic benefits are distributed.

Cryptogoods can unlock new experiences and business models for games and other forms of media.


Ten lessons from Michael Batnick’s book ‘Big Mistakes’

Ben Graham understood that no approach works all the time. There are time and place for everything. Markets evolve and some concepts stop working. A margin of safety doesn’t matter during periods of forced liquidation, especially when you are leveraged to the hill.

A high IQ guarantees you nothing! This is one of the hardest things for newer investors to come to grips with, that markets don’t compensate you just for being smart.” and “Intelligence in investing is not absolute; it’s relative. In other words, it doesn’t just matter how smart you are, it matters how smart your competition is.

The most disciplined investors are intimately aware of how they’ll behave in different market environments, so they hold a portfolio that is suited to their personality. They don’t kill themselves trying to build a perfect portfolio because they know that it doesn’t exist.