Curated Insights 2019.10.25

The cloud kitchen brews a storm for local restaurants

The mere prospect of Amazon using cloud kitchens to provide cuisine catering to every taste — and delivering these meals through services such as Deliveroo — should be enough to give any restaurateur heartburn.

For restaurant owners who ignore the shift, the latest development in the gig economy spells big trouble. Ingrained habits and the cost of delivery, particularly in the west, means that it will take several years for restaurants to feel the pinch. But as cloud kitchen companies proliferate, and the cost of delivery declines, consumers will eventually find they can have their favourite meals delivered within 30 minutes at the same price, or conceivably lower, than a restaurant now charges.

The large chain restaurants that operate pick-up locations will be insulated from many of these services, as will the high-end restaurants that offer memorable experiences. But the local trattoria, taqueria, curry shop and sushi bar will be pressed to stay in business.


‘Cloud kitchens’ is an oxymoron

Let me tell you from the world of media: Relying on other platforms to own your customers on your behalf and wait for “traffic” is a losing proposition, and one that I expect the vast majority of restaurant entrepreneurs to grok pretty quickly.

Instead, it’s the meal delivery companies themselves that will take advantage of this infrastructure, an admission that actually says something provocative about their business models: that they are essentially inter-changeable, and the only way to get margin leverage in the industry is to market and sell their own private-label brands.

All of which takes us back to those misplaced investor expectations. Cloud kitchens is an interesting concept, and I have no doubt that we will see these sorts of business models for kitchens sprout up across urban cities as an option for some restaurant owners. I’m also sure that there will be at least one digital-only brand that becomes successful and is mentioned in every virtual restaurant article going forward as proof that this model is going to upend the restaurant industry.

But the reality is that none of the players here — not the cloud kitchen owners themselves, not the restaurant owners and not the meal delivery platforms — are going to transform their margin structures with this approach. Cloud kitchens is just adding more competition to one of the most competitive industries in the world, and that isn’t a path to leverage.

A different view on Apple and China

Cook then alluded to “The Man in the Arena” passage from U.S. President Theodore Roosevelt’s “Citizenship in a Republic” speech:

“It is not the critic who counts; not the man who points out how the strong man stumbles, or where the doer of deeds could have done them better. The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood; who strives valiantly; who errs, who comes short again and again, because there is no effort without error and shortcoming; but who does actually strive to do the deeds; who knows great enthusiasms, the great devotions; who spends himself in a worthy cause; who at the best knows in the end the triumph of high achievement, and who at the worst, if he fails, at least fails while daring greatly, so that his place shall never be with those cold and timid souls who neither know victory nor defeat.”

There is no playbook for Apple management to follow when it comes to leading a trillion dollar company with a billion customers around the world. Cook’s decision to engage Apple will mean that there will be more controversies such as HKmap.live. Apple may not be completely ready for such controversies, but the company will likely be willing to confront them. Such a stance shouldn’t take anything away from Apple’s steadfast pursuit to leave the world a better place.

Trade Desk can double: TAM analysis and valuation

TTD’s position looks even stronger if you consider that Amazon actually let Trade Desk bid on its CTV advertising inventories. The other credible competitors are Adobe and MediaMath. I consider Adobe to be the bigger threat just from a sheer resource perspective, and I would note that Adobe is an “independent” that doesn’t own content/ad inventory, unlike Google or Amazon. This lack of conflict of interest gave TTD an edge over other platforms, and it might also give Adobe an edge.

AC Milan and Elliott: the hedge fund trying to crack Italian football

Top European teams are reliant on income from the Champions League. Around €2bn was shared between participating clubs last season. But to regularly qualify, AC Milan must overcome intense domestic competition from the likes of Juventus, Inter and Roma. 

Some argue that Elliott is exacerbating the tension between winning now and building for the future. A person close to club operations says Elliott had set up a “weird power struggle” by elevating familiar figures like Mr Maldini and Mr Boban, while also hiring people underneath them who advocate a modern “Moneyball” approach of using statistics to locate undervalued players.

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