Curated Insights 2019.08.16

The arc of collaboration

As the ecosystem of specialized SaaS apps and workflows continues to mature, messaging becomes a place of last resort. When things are running smoothly, work happens in the apps built to produce them. And collaboration happens within them. Going to slack is increasingly a channel of last resort, for when there’s no established workflow of what to do. And as these functional apps evolve, there are fewer and fewer exceptions that need Slack. In fact, a sign of a maturing company is one that progressively removes the need to use Slack for more and more situations.

And core Dropbox is not a solution to this. People store their documents in it. But they had to use email and other messaging apps to tell their co-workers which document to check out and what they needed help with. Dropbox understands this concern. It’s what’s driven their numerous forays into owning the workflows and communication channels themselves. With Carousel, Mailbox, and their new desktop apps all working to own that. However, there are constraints to owning the workflow when your fundamental atomic unit is documents. And they never quite owned the communication channels.

Slack is not air traffic control that coordinates everything. It’s 911 for when everything falls apart. Every slack message about a new document your feedback is wanted on or coordinating about what a design should look like is a failing of process or tools. Slack is exception handling. When there’s no other way to make sure someone sees and update, or knows context, Slack is the 911 that can be used.

And as Figma expands into plugins, the ecosystem will continue to solve for more and more of the needs and exceptions. Over time, our workflows align with our functional flows. And collaboration is no exception. And Figma is not alone. More and more apps in all categories understand that collaboration should and must be built in as a first party if they want to best serve their customers. Notion, Airtable, etc all understand this. The feedback loops of collaboration get so short that they become part of the productivity loop.

Disruption: Finding the right balance in confinement care

Unlike 28 Days, Pantang Plus has 150 confinement therapists (aged between 25 and 60) working directly with the start-up. The company had to recruit a workforce of that size after they were challenged to do so. “During MaGIC’s accelerator programme in 2016, we could only handle four therapists at a time. But after that, we were tasked to take in 100 of them. So by word of mouth, we managed to recruit 102 therapists,” says Zamzana, adding that Pantang Plus also received a RM30,000 grant to kick off its business.

When orders started pouring in, the company needed to process the transactions quickly. It was difficult as it had to accommodate massage bookings, process quotations, confirm orders and send out therapists. After enlisting Hisamudin, a former systems engineer who had sold his media start-up, she managed to expedite the processes. The duo were coached to focus on a certain segment and they chose the affluent and urban market.

According to Hisamudin, by tapping this particular segment, they get fewer customers but each of them is more lucrative. The company managed to grow its business from 20 bookings in 2016 (which work out to about RM43,347 in sales) to 156 bookings (RM418,540) last year. Since its debut, the company has paid out about RM280,000 to therapists.

Before the online platform was set up, there was a lot of back and forth with the customers and building trust was not difficult, says Zamzana. But now that a lot of the processes are automated, she has noticed that customers are more hesitant and apprehensive about the services it offers. “So, I created a standard operating procedure (SOP) where we meet with customers for personalised consultation sessions so we can manage their expectations,” she says.

There is also an SOP for customers to protect the therapists. “There have been cases where they were mistreated, paid unfairly or were told to do all sorts of things beyond their job scope. The SOP lays out the conditions that govern the packages that are subscribed to. So, I take full responsibility if the customer is not satisfied or if the therapist is mistreated,” says Zamzana.

Hisamudin says the company is constantly improving the platform to automate the back-end process for both the customer and therapist. “We also plan to automate the payment gateway so we don’t have to check whether we have received payments from customers, which can be tedious,” he adds.

WeWork’s S-1: some quick observations

In connection with this offering, Rebekah and Adam are dedicating additional resources to amplify the positive global impact of our organisation. This effort is designed to enable us to scale our social and global impact as the Company grows. Rebekah and Adam Neumann have pledged $1 billion to fund charitable causes. To fulfil this pledge, Rebekah and Adam will contribute cash and equity to charitable causes within the 10 years following this offering. Their first contribution aids in the conservation of over 20 million acres of intact tropical forest, including the region pictured on the final page of this prospectus. To evidence their commitment to charitable causes and to ensure this commitment is meaningful, if Adam and Rebekah have not contributed at least $1 billion to charitable causes as of the ten-year anniversary of the closing date of this offering, holders of all of the Company’s high-vote stock will only be entitled to ten votes per share instead of twenty votes per share.

Adam currently has a line of credit of up to $500 million with UBS AG, Stamford Branch, JPMorgan Chase Bank, N.A. and Credit Suisse AG, New York Branch, of which approximately $380 million principal amount was outstanding as of July 31, 2019. The line of credit is secured by a pledge of approximately [blank] shares of our Class B common stock beneficially owned by Adam. In addition, JPMorgan Chase Bank, N.A. has made loans and extended credit to Adam totalling $97.5 million across a variety of lending products, including mortgages secured by personal property. None of these other lending products are secured by a pledge of any of Adam’s shares of capital stock in the Company.

Asset managers with $74 trillion on brink of historic shakeout

In this new environment, the beneficiaries have been the world’s largest asset managers, who are wielding far more influence and increasingly attracting a larger share of investor money. They’ve been able to take advantage of their size to keep overall expenses down and help make up for lower fees. Crucially, they’re also the most likely to be offering both passive investments as well as actively managed funds. That means the biggest firms are just getting bigger: The two largest U.S. indexing titans—BlackRock Inc. and Vanguard—oversee combined assets of around $12 trillion this year, up from less than $8 trillion just five years ago.

Fidelity Investments once boasted the world’s largest mutual fund. But the Fidelity Magellan Fund that stock-picking star Lynch propelled from a $20 million offering into a multibillion-dollar behemoth is not even in the world’s top 25 mutual funds today, according to Morningstar. In a sign of the times, only three of the top 10 funds worldwide are actively managed funds, Morningstar data show.

Europe’s fund industry has remained fragmented, in part, because it’s dominated by divisions of banks and the link hasn’t been an advantage as the financial firms focused less on building their fund units and more on averting crisis after crisis.

The booming, ethically dubious business of food delivery

In 2020, more than half of restaurant spending is projected to be “off premise”—not inside a restaurant. In other words, spending on deliveries, drive-throughs, and takeaway meals will soon overtake dining inside restaurants, for the first time on record. According to the investment group Cowen and Company, off-premise spending will account for as much as 80 percent of the industry’s growth in the next five years.


How the supermarket helped America win the Cold War

Between 1946 and 1954 in the U.S., the share of food bought in supermarkets rose from 28 percent to 48 percent. By 1963, that number had risen to nearly 70 percent. A&P had so much market power that the Department of Justice went after it for anticompetitive practices. This was an interesting development, considering that the U.S. Government played such a significant role in the creation of supermarkets in the first place.

RV Capital’s view on Variable Interest Entities

The VIE structure is incredibly favourable from a Chinese perspective. Control of the companies remains in China. The contractual right to cashflow is mainly theoretical as most companies reinvest most of their earnings (which makes sense given the opportunities for growth). Finally, it aligns with the government’s legitimate aim to foster a competitive and vigorous economy that the costs of said competition are borne in part by foreign capital whilst the benefits accrue exclusively to its citizens. Why would China ever do anything to risk the VIE structure when anything that superseded it could only possibly be less favourable?


Tenure voting and rethinking what’s fair in corporate governance

Tenure-based voting would allow all shareholders to have an equal opportunity to earn a greater say in a company’s governance. All longer-term investors — with the definition of “longer term” agreed upon by the company and its shareholders — would earn more rights to weigh in on strategy and management, while shorter-term investors would simply vote with their feet by selling their shares if they aren’t aligned with that strategy. In adopting a tenure-based voting system, a company and its shareholders would need to determine the time periods associated with higher-vote stock. For example, all shares could start with one vote per share as of the acquisition date of the shares, and after, say, a two-year hold period, accrete to 1.5 votes per share, with perhaps additional votes per share for each additional holding period. If an investor were to sell her shares, the new holder of the shares would start at one vote/one share and begin a new holding period. The rules could be tailored to achieve whatever goals the shareholders have in mind, probably requiring a majority of shareholders to approve the initial plan (or any substantive modifications).

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