Curated Insights 2018.06.03

How will GDPR affect digital marketers?

  • Organisations with an existing marketing database must re-solicit every person’s consent (via an explicit opt-in) since individuals may have been added to the database without their consent.
  • All opt-out consent boxes must be replaced by opt-in (without the box being pre-checked).
  • Collection and processing of data to deliver your core service (e.g. fulfil orders) can continue unchanged, but if you wish to use historical data for marketing purposes, you need consent.
  • Personalised ad targeting based on an individual’s specific behaviours, such as that offered by many programmatic media companies, is illegal without active content. However, targeting based on broad interest-based audience segments is permissible so long as individuals cannot be identified.
  • The purchasing or sharing of personal data (such as email lists) is prohibited unless each person in the list has expressly permitted their details to be passed on to third parties. Event organisers, for example, can no longer share lists of attendees with sponsors.
  • Where data must be passed to another organisation for legitimate business reasons, you should ensure they are also compliant with GDPR. This is particularly important if data is passed to organisations outside the EU who may be less familiar with its data protection obligations.
  • Your customers now have the right to ask what data you hold and to have their data deleted permanently.
  • Any breach of personal data integrity (e.g. through theft, hacking, or incompetence) must be notified to the authorities within 72 hours. Organisations should audit who has access to personal data and ensure they are aware of their GDPR security obligations.

The iPhone may not be what finally pushes Apple over $1tn

The performance of this services division, largely overseen by senior vice-president Eddy Cue, has been a model of consistency when placed next to the feast-or-famine performance of the iPhone. Since 2006, it has grown at an average rate of 23 per cent year on year, according to Gene Munster, a veteran Apple analyst turned investor at Loup Ventures.

If it was valued like other “software as a service” companies such as Adobe, Dropbox or Intuit, Mr Munster reckons, at a multiple of 10 times 2018’s estimated revenues, Apple’s services business would be worth $381bn all by itself. 

For Google, all roads lead back to search

Underpinning this is the mobile business, which has given Google’s search engine a new lease of life. With smartphone users carrying out more frequent internet searches, the “paid clicks” — the number of times users click on its advertisements — jumped 59 per cent in the first three months of this year, continuing an acceleration seen over recent quarters. Even with average ad prices falling 19 per cent, the result has been a pick-up in growth.

The question now is whether Google’s newer businesses will extend this momentum into new markets in the years to come. Foremost among them is YouTube. The online video arm already has $20bn in annual revenue and could grow at 20-30 per cent a year for the next five years, forecast Mark Mahaney, an analyst at RBC Capital Markets. The potential is enormous: YouTube’s revenue represents only around 10 per cent of the amount spent globally on traditional TV advertising.

Google’s cloud computing business, meanwhile, could represent an even bigger opportunity. The cloud market is projected to be worth nearly $250bn by 2021, according to tech research firm Gartner.

That could one day make driverless cars a huge business for Google. Analysts at UBS forecast that Waymo’s technology lead will translate into revenues for Alphabet in 2030 that are equivalent to 80 per cent of its entire group revenue in 2020.

Marchionne’s finale entails expanding Jeep, shrinking Fiat

Jeep — which accounts for more than 70 percent of profits, according to analysts’ estimates — will increasingly become the focal point of the group. Marchionne is set to target doubling the brand’s sales volume by 2022 from about 1.4 million vehicles last year. The growth is based on expanding Jeep’s presence in Asia, Brazil and Europe as well as widening its product offering with hybrid variants starting next year. Marchionne has already indicated that he sees chances to double the group’s profit in the coming five years on booming Jeep sales.

Buffett proposed $3 billion Uber investment but deal crumbled

Under the proposed agreement, Berkshire Hathaway would have provided a convertible loan to Uber that would have protected Buffett’s investment should Uber hit financial straits, while providing significant upside if Uber continued to grow in value, said the people, who spoke under condition of anonymity because the discussions were private. Buffett’s initial offer was well above $3 billion, one of the people said.

During negotiations Uber Chief Executive Officer Dara Khosrowshahi proposed decreasing the size of the deal to $2 billion, one person said, hoping to get Buffett’s backing while giving him a potentially smaller share of the company. The deal fell apart after the two sides couldn’t agree on terms, one of the people said.


Airbnb founders go it alone in China after refusing merger offer

Tujia remains keen to cut a deal—although both sides deny formal talks—and says it’s simply waiting for Airbnb executives to accept reality. “We would love to issue shares in Tujia in exchange for Airbnb’s China operations,” says Tujia Chief Financial Officer Warren Wang. Until Airbnb is ready, “we will prove ourselves and show our muscle,” he said. “If Airbnb needs more time to understand that they or any other foreign tech companies just can’t do that well in China without a local partner, once we show them they’ll sit down and talk about a deal.”

Home-sharing in China differs from the U.S. and Europe, where travelers are accustomed to a rich bed-and-breakfast culture and many hosts rent out their primary homes while they’re away. In China, hosts don’t want strangers in their own homes. Instead, home sharing has thrived because a national building boom left a glut of empty apartments in the hands of real estate firms and property investors. With homes vacant, local home-sharing companies are tapped to clean, list and manage properties.

Initially, Airbnb operated a skeleton operation in China with 30 people, focused on attracting mainlanders going overseas. Chinese tourists took 131 million overseas trips and spent $115 billion abroad last year, according to the China National Tourism Academy. But after noticing a surge of Chinese tourists using Airbnb abroad and thriving local home-sharing apps, the company in 2015 decided to expand its domestic China business. It’s a market well worth chasing: The domestic tourism industry took in 4.57 trillion yuan ($710 billion) in 2017, up 15.9 percent from the year before, according to the China National Tourism Administration. Unlike small hotel rooms, home stays let Chinese travel with extended families, cook Chinese fare and bring pets.

A Fed report this week found that gig work is a very small share of family income. For over 75% of gig workers, these activities account for 10% or less of their family income. This picture is also confirmed when looking at the ride-sharing market, see first chart below. The total number of Uber drivers in the US is 833,000 and translated into full-time full-year jobs there are about 100,000 Uber drivers. Comparing these numbers with US economy-wide employment of 148mn shows that the gig economy is more myth than reality. Another way to look at it is to think about how small a share of your total income goes to car services. If you still are not convinced, take a look at the second chart below, which shows the share of people who are self-employed. Why is the gig economy getting so much attention? It is probably because many people in Manhattan now use ride-sharing apps and mistakenly think that what they are seeing is representative for the rest of the economy.

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