Regional Notes 2018.03.30

China’s push for tech self-sufficiency threatens Asia’s exporters

But at the same time, there’s been a spike in sales to China of precision metal working machines and equipment for making chips from firms like Japan’s Yaskawa Electric Corp. With a Chinese state-backed fund gearing up to pour as much as $31.5 billion into homegrown semiconductor manufacturing, there’s potential for trade flows to start to shift.

Yet the direction is clear: Beijing is aiming higher and it has the resources to reach its destination. And that will mean difficulties for many companies around the region. “China, in a very short period of time, is rapidly going up the value chain,” said Gary Hufbauer, senior fellow and trade specialist at the Peterson Institute for International Economics in Washington, speaking from Taos, New Mexico. “They will produce the things that Korea and Japan are now producing, and Korean and Japanese firms have a big challenge to try to keep ahead on the technology.”


Uber pulls out of Southeast Asia, selling operation to rival Grab

The cease-fire marks a victory for Grab as well as SoftBank Group Corp., the biggest shareholder in both companies. Masayoshi Son’s firm is pushing to reduce competition in a Southeast Asian ride-hailing market forecast to reach $20.1 billion by 2025. Uber and Grab, together with two other SoftBank-backed ride-hailing firms — India’s Ola and China’s Didi Chuxing — provide about 45 million rides a day, according to SoftBank presentation material in February.


Regulators to ensure Grab-Uber deal will not erode competition

“We will ensure that no one single market player dominates the sector to the detriment of commuters and drivers,” an LTA spokesman said. The LTA added that it was reviewing a regulatory framework to license private-hire car operators “to keep the private-hire car and taxi industries open and contestable”.

The CCS said Singapore’s competition laws prohibit mergers that may result in a “substantial lessening of competition”, and indicated that it could “require the merger to be unwound or modified” to prevent an erosion of competition. It said it could also issue “interim measures” before it made up its mind.

The taxi company agreed in December to pay some $640 million for a 51 per cent stake in Uber’s Singapore rental car fleet. ComfortDelGro spokesman Tammy Tan said: “We are reviewing all aspects of the proposed tie-up with Uber Technologies, which is currently under review by the CCS.”

Pentamaster plans dividend in two years

“Currently, 50% of our exports go to mainland China, including to US-based multinational corporations located there. We expect the exports to rise to 60% in the near future. The business opportunity is great which is why we are expanding our facilities.”

“I think KWAP is seeing the potential in the future of technology we are in — 3D sensing. It is going to be used a lot in autonomous cars and electric vehicles. We have developed a 3D sensor testing capability to test the component that can be used in telco, automotive and smartphones.”

He said five years ago, PCB only focused on automotive handlers without test solutions, which “anyone could do”, so he built the handler with tester as a complete ecosystem to reduce competition.

“We are also looking to secure more IARM business from the US. We have secured a few now. This segment has a lot of growth potential because of Industry 4.0 where factories look to becoming fully automised. Our technical sales unit in Sunnyvale, US, would be able to discuss with clients regarding requests for quotations and proposals. Proximity to our clients is key, hence we see our US business growing. More so now with the US placing 30% tariff on raw materials which would make manufacturing in US expensive.”


US tariffs may hurt Malaysian technology firms

However, a report last Friday by Nomura highlighted US trade protectionism and a sharper-than-expected slowdown in China as bigger risks to the Malaysian economy, as exports account for 71% of GDP. “We estimated Malaysia’s ultimate exposure to the US — including via intermediate goods to China for assembly into final products destined for the US — at 10% of GDP, about half of which is in electronics products,” the research house said, adding that another 8% is exposed to China’s final demand.


Minimal impact on M’sia from US tariffs

This is because Malaysia’s trade exposure to both China and the US accounted for 25% of its total trade, she said, pointing out that Malaysia was impacted by Washington’s earlier move to impose tariffs on solar panels.

Malaysia is the largest exporter of solar cells and panels to the US, accounting for 24% of total US imports of the products last year. Meanwhile, the country’s steel and aluminium exports to the US of US$300 million in 2016 accounted for only 1.8% of total exports to the US.

In 2017, China was Malaysia’s second-largest export destination, constituting 13.5% or RM126.2 billion of total exports, while the US was the third-largest export destination, accounting for 9.5% or RM88 billion of Malaysia’s total exports.

Bank Negara cautions of severe property market imbalances

“Such (the purchase of non-residential properties) financing accounted for 26.1% of banks’ exposures to the property market or 13.5% of banks’ total outstanding loans. End-financing for the purchase of shops accounted for the bulk (40%) of banks’ exposures to non-residential properties or 5.4% of banks’ total outstanding loans. Exposures (via end-financing) to the office space and shopping complex segments, where oversupply is particularly acute, accounted for 3.2% of banks’ total outstanding loans,” it said.

Based on Bank Negara’s analysis, the incoming supply of 38 million square feet of new office space in Klang Valley is expected to drive vacancy rates to an all-time high of 32% by 2021 (1997: 5.1%; historical high in 2001: 25.3%), far surpassing levels recorded during the Asian Financial Crisis (AFC).

The incoming supply of 140 new shopping complexes by 2021 across Klang Valley, Penang and Johor is expected to worsen the oversupply condition in this segment. In 2016, major states such as Penang, Klang Valley and Johor already had higher retail space per capita (10.5, 8.2 and 5.1 square feet per person, respectively) relative to regional cities such as Hong Kong and Singapore (3.6 and 1.5 square feet per person, respectively). This will continue to exert downward pressure on occupancy rates and rentals.


Malaysians’ income weighed down by low-wage foreign workers

“In Malaysia, our salaries and wages are low, as half of the working Malaysians earn less than RM1,700 per month and the average starting salary of a diploma graduate is only about RM350 above the minimum wage. The low-income segment of Malaysian households face many challenges with regard to their income level. Since 2014, the bottom 40% (B40) population’s income expanded by 5.8% on an annual basis. However, expenditure grew at a faster pace of 6%, reflecting the rising cost of living. It is high time to reform our labour market by creating high-quality, good-paying jobs for Malaysians,” he said at a media briefing after the release of the central bank’s 2017 annual report here yesterday.

From 2011 to 2017, the share of low-skilled jobs in Malaysia increased significantly to 16% compared with only 8% in the period of 2002 to 2010. Apart from that, local economic sectors that rely on foreign workers such as agriculture, construction and manufacturing also suffer from low productivity.

Leave a Reply