Company Notes 2017.10.06

iCapital.biz Q1 FY2018 Results

For top-down/market-timing investors, while Malaysia’s economic growth prospects for the next 12-18 months look bright, there are potential headwinds in the form of an elevated inflation rate, an uncertain political landscape and further US monetary tightening.

Bison ventures into food production

“There is increasing demand for convenient access to retail stores that offer a variety of quality products and services. Therefore, these JVs are in line with Bison’s growth and expansion strategy.”

Dang said some RM50 million worth of investment will be going into building the five-level food processing factory in Rawang, which is targeted to start operations in the first quarter of 2019. “[A selection] of products will be available on a trial and research basis, but the full scale of [offerings] will be rolled out in the first quarter of 2019, which is when the food processing facility will be fully operational.”

“This FY, we have grown our ready-to-eat food business from 8% to 11% of our revenue contribution. Upon the commencement of the first year of production, we expect it to grow to about 15% of our revenue.”


Bison ups the ante

A five-level factory with a built-up area of more than 130,000 sq ft will now be constructed. It is located 500 metres from Bison’s current distribution centre, which augurs well for management and logistics efficiencies. The 100% halal manufacturing facility is targeted to supply 150 stores in 2019, and will have a full supply capacity of up to 600 stores.

GK, a Tokyo Stock Exchange-listed company, is one of the largest in-flight meal caterers in Japan, supplying to 38 airlines, and also owns a restaurant chain operation with more than 400 stores in and out of Japan. On the other hand, Ryoyupan is one of the top-five players in the Japanese bakery industry and the biggest on Kyushu Island.


The rise and rise of JF Technology

“Demand for microchips is not only dependent on consumer spending, which drives the smartphones and computer sales. Now there is emerging demand from the automotive and IoT (internet of things) sectors.”

JF Technology is involved in the design and manufacture of test probes and test sockets for the semiconductor industry. For one, testing equipment such as test probes and sockets are wear-and-tear products that need to be changed frequently. For another, semiconductor giants such as Texas Instruments that designs chips would constantly develop new products regardless of market conditions. As a test socket design and manufacturer, JF Tech provides customised solutions for the chips developer to test their products. Once the chip prototype is acceptable, it will then goes into high volume manufacturing (HVM).

“We believe Zigma product would be a game changer for the company, as well as the testing industry. This is because Zigma product has a different approach, which it avoids wear on the board and make the testing process more efficient.” He says that the law suit has affected the company’s sales in the US and profitability. JF Tech generates about 65% of its sales from the overseas market. Foong says that the company is currently operating at 40% of its capacity, as such JF Tech is unlikely to pump any new capital expenditure for few years.


SunCon, WCT, Gabungan AQRS bag LRT3 contracts

SunCon announced to Bursa Malaysia yesterday that it had been awarded a RM2.18 billion contract, boosting its outstanding order book to RM6.5 billion — the highest ever since its inception. The contract is SunCon’s fourth elevated rail project, its largest single project in 36 years. The scope of work includes 9.2km of viaduct works, construction of six stations, and the design and building of an iconic cable-stayed bridge over the Klang River.


United Malacca confident of finalising Sulawesi land buy

“The first priority is to plant stevia and coconut, followed by cocoa and coffee, which are subject to the land topography and soil type.”

At the same time, Tan also said the development of the Central Sulawesi land is expected to incur higher capital expenditure, which could result in lower dividend payments compared with the previous years.


MAHB: Five new airlines coming to KLIA

“I just come back from the World Routes Forum 2017 in Barcelona, Spain where multiple discussion were had and I am hopeful that at least five more new airlines will join us next year. As you know, we are always actively looking for partners and new airlines to come join us, for 2017 we already saw eight new airlines joining us and since everything in aviation is seasonal, we are not expecting any more new airlines for the rest of the year.”

“Our original (growth) forecast (for passenger volume) was at six per cent this year but we have revised that to eight per cent, and I believe we may end up at some 90 million this year for Malaysia as a whole. For airports, we have the volume but we need more capacity (upgrading) for airports infrastructure and that’s something that the government has to look into.”


KLIA Aeropolis to see RM500m investment in next two years

The 60-acre (24.28ha) Aeropolis, which is part of the Digital Free Trade Zone (DFTZ) launched by the government in March this year, will also house Alibaba Group’s e-commerce hub for Southeast Asia. Malaysia Airports Holdings Bhd and Alibaba’s logistics arm, Cainiao Network, will be jointly establishing the trans-shipment hub there.

Liow said 20 of the world’s top 25 freight forwarders will have operations in the Aeropolis.

“It is estimated that a 20% increase in ICT investment will result in around 1.4% GDP growth for Malaysia,” Liow added.

Fitch expects Malaysian banks to offer higher rates on longer-term FDs

The NSFR metric focuses on a 12-month timeframe and is likely to encourage banks to compete more aggressively for even longer-tenor deposits, and shift towards long-term wholesale debt funding.

The ratings agency noted that Bank Negara Malaysia (BNM) has said that more than three-quarters of Malaysian banks have an NSFR that meets the minimum requirement, which will be set at 100%.

The banking sector’s loan/deposit ratio of 89% and liquidity coverage ratio (LCR) of 133% at end-August 2017 indicate that the system’s aggregate funding and liquidity are reasonably healthy.


KWAP mulls investment in Alibaba Group

“We have an asset allocation and, at the moment, investment in the tech space is still well below the asset allocation limit. We are trying to limit it to no more than 1% of our asset allocation in the tech space. At the moment, it’s just US$70 million (RM296.1 million). Our fund size is over RM100 billion.”

“KWAP has only ventured into the tech space recently. Two years ago, we invested in Uber. We have another two more tech funds that we have invested in. This is part of our familiarisation with the industry. So far, to date, we have put in about US$70 million: US$30 million with Uber and another US$40 million with two tech funds … we can do a bit more and we would like to have more involvement in this space. We have learnt a lot along the way and, with that, I think we can step up and make more productive investments moving forward.”


Property lending rule from 1997 is still relevant

“IBs, in demanding for this guideline to be ‘scrapped’, are taking a short-term view and should consider the long-term systemic implications of an over-exposure to the property sector and not narrowly focus on their own commercial gains. We should not be oblivious to the many lessons learnt from the Asian and global financial crises,” Bank Negara said in the statement.

The guideline, introduced on April 1, 1997, is for all commercial, Islamic and investment banks. In short, it stipulates that a bank’s credit facilities — meaning all forms of lending, including the issue of guarantees, private debt securities and commercial papers — to the BPS should not exceed 20% of its total outstanding loan base. Compliance to this requirement is calculated on a quarterly basis.


World Bank warns M’sia of pockets of risks

The World Bank in its semi-annual review of the region’s developing economies pointed out that the ongoing adjustments to the rising costs of living amid continued fiscal consolidation and elevated household indebtedness could weigh on the strength of private consumption in Malaysia. These deficits are especially worrying in cases where public debt is also high or rising. It is a combination of the two that poses risks to fiscal sustainability as the combination narrows governments’ policy space for responding to shocks.


World Bank sees currency risk in Malaysia

Monetary authorities need to be prepared to tighten their policy stance if capital outflows prompt currency weakness. In the case of depreciation pressures in China, authorities should allow greater adjustment through relative prices and closely monitor financial sector vulnerabilities as monetary policy further tightens.

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