Curated Insights 2017.07.16

Tom Russo on shareholder value creation and global brands

Competition is both global and local. The fight is typically fair, but not always. In India, for instance, Nestlé suffered a below-the-belt punch with its famous Maggi instant soup business. It suffered a massive goodwill assault by local forces that alleged the product would kill young children because of ingredients that were toxic. There is absolutely no hard science to support the claim. Yet, it ran across all 250 newspapers in India, and Nestlé’s brand preference score for the Maggi product dropped from 98% to 8%.

The century of biology

When engineering, biology, and computer science come together it elevates bio to a “read/write” paradigm. That is, you don’t just read the code of biology but you can also write, or design, with it.

…when you looked at a cell type that was normal, and you looked at its related diseased counterpart, you could see changes in the differential set of genes that were being expressed in one cell type vs. another (the cell program). Sometimes there’s not a mutated gene that’s causing the disease — it’s not just a bug or “bad gene” in the code (genomics) — it’s the cell running the wrong program, which is where epigenomics comes in again. The gene doesn’t just turn on and off like a light switch to cause disease, it can be more like a dimmer, going higher or lower (too much or too little of a gene). What causes a healthy cell to shift in to a diseased state, whether it’s cells multiplying uncontrollably in cancer or dormant immune cells suddenly getting activated in autoimmune disease? The ability to understand how the genome is being deployed or regulated within a cell — is it the wrong dosage or level for a particular set of genes? — becomes a very interesting new avenue to help us get to the right drug, for the right patient, at the right dose, and at the right time.

This leads us to the second derivatives of read/write, which is to enable insight/design. We’re not just generating data on the read side, we’re also fundamentally understanding it deeply in ways that we couldn’t before, especially with multiple data streams and machine learning to help make sense of it all. And on the write side, we’re not just editing, we’re also designing with biology. In the future, biology can become its own creative medium of sorts.

…our ability to read/write biology will disrupt a wide range of industries. In addition to its obvious impact across health, we’re increasingly using biology for manufacturing. Eventually it’s going to impact areas people don’t typically think about as “biological” — like textiles, architecture, and many more areas — in ways we can’t even conceive of yet.


Scientists can use CRISPR to store images and movies in bacteria

CRISPR was invented billions of years ago, as a way for bacteria to defend themselves against viruses. The bacteria grab the DNA of invading viruses, incorporating it into their own genomes. That viral DNA always gets inserted in the same place, and new sequences get added after old ones, as if the bacteria were stacking books on a shelf. They use these archives to guide an enzyme called Cas9, which cuts and disables any viral DNA that matches the stored sequences.

So, first and foremost, CRISPR is a kind of genetic memory—a system for storing information. And that information doesn’t have to be the DNA of viruses. Scientists can now encode any digital file in the form of DNA, by converting the ones and zeroes of binary code into As, Cs, Gs, and Ts of the double helix.

Recording information in DNA isn’t new: That’s effectively what living things have been doing since the dawn of life itself. More recently, scientists have realized that DNA makes the perfect storage medium. It takes up so little space that you could fit all the world’s data in the back of a truck. It’s durable, provided it’s kept cold, dry, and dark. And it is immune to obsolescence: DVDs and Blu-Rays will eventually go the way of cassettes and laser discs, but humans will always have the desire and means to read DNA.​


In China, shoppers buy bad loans online with their groceries

For 4.15 million yuan ($610,000), customers on the site can bid for the debt of a steelmaker from Zhejiang. The company has failed to pay back a 9.95 million-yuan loan, including interest, so a distressed asset manager is auctioning it off to the highest online bidder.

“Financial technology and e-commerce in China has reached a high level of sophistication. Online platforms are leveling the playing field in the distressed debt market as it means everybody gets access to the same information.”

“Conducting NPL auctions online has increasingly become a trend. More investors are using Taobao as a platform because of the simplicity, transparency and confidentiality of the bidders’ identity.”

But bad-loan investing isn’t like trading equities or even ordinary debt, which raises questions over the opening up of the market to rank-and-file investors.

The most important moat

“A Bezos Moat is premised on the idea that the customer is willingly and is frequently entering into a commercial transaction with the company because the customer is deriving more value from the transaction than he or she is paying for.

“A Buffett Moat attempts to identify companies that will be the only one (or one of a few) available in a commercial landscape, so that the customer is, in effect, forced to transact with these companies (i.e. only bridge, only newspaper, only soft drink option).”

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